WhidbeyHealth Sign Unveiling

The hospital is now officially WhidbeyHealth Medical Center. The new sign was unveiled Monday morning with some helpers. From left to right: Erin Hedrick; Kristine Young, PA-C; Angi and Emmy Carlson; and hospital board commissioner Grethe Cammermeyer. — Image Credit: Debra Vaughn/Whidbey News-Times

The hospital is now officially WhidbeyHealth Medical Center. The new sign was unveiled Monday morning with some helpers. From left to right: Erin Hedrick; Kristine Young, PA-C; Angi and Emmy Carlson; and hospital board commissioner Grethe Cammermeyer. — Image Credit: Debra Vaughn/Whidbey News-Times

by DEBRA VAUGHN,  Whidbey News-Times Staff Reporter 

With a few pulls from some strings, a purple sign with the new name of the hospital was revealed Monday morning in Coupeville: WhidbeyHealth Medical Center.

WhidbeyHealth is now officially the umbrella name for the hospital and its services and clinics.

“Health care is changing and so must we,” Chief Executive Officer Geri Forbes told a small crowd gathered for the unveiling.

Officials invited 98-year-old Jean Sherman to help with the unveiling. She and her husband were some of the local community members who helped start the hospital. Also present were a 7-day-old baby boy born at the hospital and Kristine Young, a physician’s assistant, also born at the hospital formerly known as Whidbey General.

Hospital officials hope the change will make it easier for the public to identify and use the multiple services and clinics operated by the Whidbey Island Public Hospital District.

The idea went over like a lead balloon with the public when it was introduced last winter. Officials have since worked to explain to the public why they think the cost of coming up with a new name and logo and implementing the change is money well spent.

The hospital conducted market research that indicated “uneven awareness” that services are connected or coordinated, according to a document from a consultant. Many of the clinics operated with different names and signs, making it harder for the public to “connect the dots” between them and Whidbey General. The eight clinics operate under six different names.

The research also indicated more people would access health care services if they knew about them and that people value providers working as a team to care for them.

Click here to watch the short video of the unveiling of the new WhidbeyHealth Medical Center sign that took place on Monday June 13th. It includes brief comments by Anne Tarrant and Geri Forbes. The unveiling team was multigenerational to say the very least. The youngest participant was 7 days old, our most senior attendee was 98 years young. Every child who participated was born here; one “child,” Kristine Young, PA-C, was born here in 1972 and is today one of our awesome primary care providers.

Newport Hospital & Health Services

Whether you are a resident of the greater Pend Oreille Valley, Priest River, Priest Lake or are just passing through for recreation in the great outdoors, Newport Hospital and Health Services provides care when you need it, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. As a critical access hospital with two rural health clinics, we offer excellent care to all and proudly serve as a patient-centered medical home to our residents in Eastern Washington and our neighbors in Northern Idaho.

Local hospital CEO’s receive state Health Care Association award

(Grays Harbor Community Hospital) Tom and Renée Jensen pose for a photo with their Joe Hopkins Memorial Awards after being honored by the Washington State Hospital Association.

(Grays Harbor Community Hospital) Tom and Renée Jensen pose for a photo with their Joe Hopkins Memorial Awards after being honored by the Washington State Hospital Association.

Grays Harbor’s two hospital chief executives, a married couple who head up different hospitals, shared the spotlight recently as they were both honored with the prestigious Joe Hopkins Memorial Award by the Washington State Hospital Association.

For the first time in its history, the association awarded two of the honors for outstanding leadership, one to Renée Jensen, CEO of Summit Pacific Medical Center in Elma, and one to Grays Harbor Community Hospital CEO Tom Jensen.

They were each recognized for their individual achievement in ensuring acute and primary health care services for their communities.

“Through their tireless commitment, their creativity and their sheer determination, Renée and Tom have ensured that their communities will have health care,” said WSHA board chairman Gregg Davidson. “The awards committee was unanimous in their desire to see both of them recognized. It’s always risky to make an exception, but exceptional people deserve to be recognized.” Continue reading

Groundbreaking for Jefferson Healthcare’s new facility highlights community benefits

PORT TOWNSEND — Jefferson Healthcare’s new Emergency and Special Services building is part of a community wide face-lift and will impact more than just local health care, according to the hospital’s CEO.

“What is quietly happening in our community is a massive investment in education, health and wellness, health care and many other social services important to our quality of life,” Mike Glenn said during a ceremonial groundbreaking for the new facility Monday.

“While this building is a huge deal for Jefferson Healthcare, it’s just part of the picture for Jefferson County, and we need to keep focused on all the other pieces until our work is done.” Continue reading

Snoqualmie Valley Hospital gets fresh start

The new, Snoqualmie Valley Hospital is officially open, as of Wednesday, May 6. Hospital CEO Rodger McCollum described the move-in as “flawlessly executed,” during the Thursday, May 7, hospital board meeting at Snoqualmie City Hall.

McCollum took the time to thank the Snoqualmie Valley Hospital Auxiliary club before opening up the floor to hospital COO Tom Parker.

“I’m happy to report to you that we are in the hospital,” Parker began, “as you know, but I just had to say those words.”

Parker said that despite the labor-intensive workload, the number-one goal was always patient and staff safety during the move.

“I’m pleased to report we were able to achieve that,” he continued.

Parker thanked the numerous moving committees who were “engaged in every detail,” including the Snoqualmie Fire Department for volunteering with sensitive equipment transportation, Tri-Med Ambulance for volunteering to move patients to the new facility, the hard work of the hired moving company Commercial Office Interiors and Jill Green, the hospital’s marketing and communications director. Continue reading

Senate Hearing Provides Template for Rural Health Advocacy

John Commins, for HealthLeaders Media, May 13, 2015

There is no new news about rural healthcare’s plight. If citizens, media, and legislators don’t get it, rural healthcare leaders are at fault.

Testimony at a U.S. Senate subcommittee last week provides an excellent template for anyone concerned about rural healthcare.

There wasn’t much actual news to contemplate during the May 7 hearing before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Related Agencies, but it was still worth noting.

In a nutshell, the hearing provided rural healthcare providers with a soapbox to spell out the unique challenges facing those who deliver healthcare to the 51 million generally older, sicker, and less affluent Americans who live in about 80% of the nation’s land mass. Continue reading

Welcome Geri Forbes to the Washington Rural Health Collaborative Board

Geri Forbes. — Image Credit: Michelle Beahm / Whidbey News Group

Geri Forbes. — Image Credit: Michelle Beahm / Whidbey News Group

The Washington Rural Health Collaborative would like to welcome Geri Forbes, new CEO at Whidbey General Hospital to the Board of Directors! Geri Forbes hails from Doctors Memorial Hospital, a 49 bed rural hospital in Perry, FL, where she has been the CEO since Sept. 2012. Forbes is a seasoned leader in healthcare operations, strategic planning and performance improvement. Her career has evolved over the years from a leader on the physician practice management side of healthcare to a senior leader in the hospital continuum of care environment. She has worked as a Hospital Service Line Design and Development Administrator and as a Senior Consultant with General Electric Medical Systems, in their Leadership Development Division. Geri joined Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare in 2004 as Administrator of Medicine Services and served in this role for 6 years, after which she assumed the role of Regional Administrator at TMH, with a focus on Population Health and Regional Development. In 2011 Geri co-developed the TMH Transition Center. The Transition Center is a short term multi-disciplinary outpatient Medical Home for patients without an established primary care physician. Geri has Masters is in Healthcare Administration, with a concentration in Rural Health and Telemedicine.

PayPal – Critical Access Hospital Compliance Training

Please register by June 29 to secure your spot.

When: Thursday, July 30, 2015 – 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Cost:$50.00 per participant   Payment and registration can be completed online via PayPal or VISA.


Name of Attendee:


If you would like to make payment via check, please mail check and Registration Form to:
Washington Rural Health Collaborative
600 E Main St.
Elma, WA 98541

Location: Radisson Hotel
18118 International Blvd, Seattle, WA 98188

Lodging: Discounted room rates of $190.00 plus tax at the Radisson Hotel are available
Please call 206-244-6666 by June 28, 2015 to secure this rate.

Questions?
Please contact Kathryn Hall-Thompson, Washington Rural Health Collaborative at (360) 346-2350 or by email at ea@washingtonruralhealth.org

 

PayPal – HCPro Medicare Bootcamp

Registration Fee

$970.00 x 2 = $1940 ($970.00 per participant for all four days. One fee covers both trainings – however, you may split the trainings between two people)
Payment and registration can be completed online via payPal or VISA.


Quantity:
Name of Attendee(s):

If you would like to make payment via check, please mail check and registration form to:
Washington Rural Health Collaborative
600 E Main St.
Elma, WA 98541

Questions?Please contact Kathryn Hall-Thompson, Washington Rural Health Collaborative at (360) 346-2350 or by email at ea@washingtonruralhealth.org

 

Two months away: New Snoqualmie Valley Hospital 
slated to open in May

snoqualmie_valleyby ALLYCE ANDREW,  Snoqualmie Valley Record Reporter

The new Snoqualmie Valley Hospital is rising at a rapid rate and doors are slated to open for patients on Wednesday, May 6.

Rodger McCollum, District CEO, laid out the hospital’s vision from its inception to the freshly painted walls of its current incarnation. The staff started dreaming of renovations nearly a decade ago, but began construction after a groundbreaking ceremony in September 2013.

“About seven or eight years ago, we looked at expanding the old hospital because we were too full then,” McCollum explained. “We only have 14 patient rooms in the old hospital, so it really is very small in today’s world. The board looked at a lot of different alternatives and decided that it probably made sense to start over.”

The hospital bought the land for $5 million and the construction was a guaranteed $38.5 million ($500 per square foot) maximum price. The development is paid for by hospital revenue. The new facility has 25 beds and an intentional amount of extra storage, restrooms and parking.

Continue reading